Eve J. Alfille Gallery and Studio

Making Markle Sparkle

One of the hottest topics of 2017 has been the happy news that England’s most eligible bachelor has finally locked it down with American actress Meghan Markle. The whole world has been a-buzz with the ensuing frenzy of planning their spring wedding…but could it be that a hot proposal by Prince Harry could also lend some interesting insights into the hot, harrowing history of the earth’s crust? 

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The Botswana resort where Meghan and Prince Harry fell in love.

 

…Of course, no royal proposal would be complete without the perfect, fairy-tale ring…a romantic at heart, Prince Harry used diamonds from his mother’s private collection, as well as a central diamond hailing from Botswana (where the royal romantics met). These days, the African nation enjoys a climate of relative volcanic peace compared to what once was: a clime so fraught with explosive volcanic power that it rained diamonds on more than one occasion (an event which would have pleased the likes of Marilyn Monroe, but for the scalding ash and magma that came with it!).
 
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It’s no secret that Botswana has boasted more diamonds than any other part of the world since the eighties…while it’s true that these lovely, lustrous gems can exist anywhere in great quantity, in most parts of the world they’re also inconveniently located 100-or-so miles underground. It takes a historically massive upheaval to send them into the air and a bit closer to the surface for miners and princes alike to easily find. Research by scientists like Janne Koornneef  has indicated two such events in the region Markle’s diamond hails from, both 1.1 billion and 3 billion years ago.
 

eruption

 

This first batch was caused when the Zimbabwe Craton -a rather sizeable chunk of the earth’s crust- broke free and slammed into a neighboring craton! The second time a diamond-scattering took place, it was during a time from whence the ‘Umkondo Large Igenous Province’ drew its name…the entire region was completely transformed by the large and overactive volcanoes covering the terrain.
 
Prince Harry engagement

 

…Not so interested in tackling the trip to Botswana for a blind date, like the auspicious pair did, or in facing walls of steaming ash for your diamonds? Maybe consider giving a visit to the Eve Alfille Gallery & Studio up in Evanston instead!

Eve J. Alfille Gallery and Studio

A Diamondiferous Discovery

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Even Kim Kardashain and Elizabeth Taylor would have a hard time wearing this new find around! The world’s second-largest gem-quality diamond ever found was unearthed in Botswana last week, weighing in at a seemingly perfect 1,111 carats. The value of the stone remains unknown, as it was too large to fit into the onsite scanner, and will have to be flown to Antwerp for proper measurement.

 

Vesuvius
“Dawn Over Vesuvius” by Eve Alfillé features 196 tantalizing diamonds and elements of  20 and 22 karat gold. Photo credit: Matt Arden. 

Just unearthed last week by the relatively minor diamond company, the Lucara Diamond firm, this unnamed stone has already been shattering records! It now comes in second only to the Cullinan diamonds of British crown jewel fame. In fact, Lucara may not remain minor for long: with this discovery, followed a mere 24 hours later by the discovery of two more strikingly sizeable diamonds in the same area, the company’s stock immediately inflated by 37 percent upon public revelation of the find.

The stone, though still un-scanned to verify its exact color and clarity, had been judged to be a Type II diamond, meaning that its brilliance is of a near-perfect quality which makes this stone look as if it was carved from the very heart of a glacier. No wonder diamonds are called “ice!”